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BLM Map of HAs and HMAs of Arizona

BLM Map of HAs and HMAs of Arizona

Information on the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) wild horse and burro management in the State of Arizona. Information is from public information sources and, can include, unique research and field observations made by Wild Horse Education Volunteers.

Terms in charts

HA- Herd Area, Arbitrary areas defined in 1971 by BLM, without regard to seasonal herd movement,  where wild herds were observed. Officially “zeroed out” there could still be wild herds in these areas.

HMA- Herd Management Area- Areas designated for management of wild herds. There were 303 HMAs; now there are less than 180, and of those 70% have populations that are no longer genetically viable.

Wild Horse Education’s BLM  “glossary” HERE

These are the latest available stat sheets for the State of Arizona.

2011 Arizona Summary

2011 Arizona Summary

BLM_Arizona_Breakdown

Arizona Breakdown

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In Arizona, the BLM manages two wild horse herds totaling approximately 200 head in the Cerbat Mountains, located northwest of Kingman and nestled between the Cibola Wildlife Refuge and the Army’s Yuma Proving Ground.  In addition, the BLM manages close to 1,600 head of wild burros roaming public lands in seven herd management areas and three herd areas.

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Discrepancies and Controversies about Official Information:

  • BLM states that they have 502 horses state wide but HMAs indicate there are 379.   How do the Cerbat Mountain 200 horse fit here?
    • http://www.blm.gov/az/st/en/prog/whb.html states that there are 200 wild horses in the Cerbat Mountains but can not be determined if this is the Cerbat (HA) or some place different.  They show this location as northwest of Kingman and nestled between the Cibola Wildlife Refuge and the Army’s Yuma Proving Ground.
  • BLM states that they have 3,194 burros but the totals for HMAs = 2,684.  510 burros are not accounted for.
  • Big Sandy has two different numbers for burros, 209 or 140 burros.
  • Wild horses in Cerbat Mountains plus 7 herd management areas and 3 herd areas.  Cannot be determined, whether Cerbat Mountains with the 200 horses is, HMA or HA?
  • The maximum Appropriate Management Level (AML), point at which BLM says the area is over capacity, is listed by BLM as  1,676.  Only one HML list AML or 478.  Can not determine if it is correct information.

Alamo HMA

The Alamo HMA lies in west central Arizona on lands adjoining Alamo Lake and portions of the Bill Williams, Santa Maria and Big Sandy rivers.

Wild horse and or burro: Burro only.    

Size: Alamo contains some 341,000 acres of land.  Bordered on the north by the Big Sandy HMA and on the west by the Havasu HMA.

Population: 305

Appropriate Management Level: Not listed

Last gather:  1979 where 900 burros were removed leaving a population of 200.

Future gathers:  Not listed

Genetic testing:  Not known

Genetic traits.  Burros in this area are typically grey in color

Big Sandy HMA

The Big Sandy Herd Management Area (HMA) is located in west central Arizona, 55 miles southeast of Kingman on either side of U.S. Highway 93. The HMA includes the areas of the Big Sandy River Valley, south of Wikieup to Alamo Lake, Burro Creek to the confluence of Boulder Creek and west through the southern foothills of the Hualapai Mountains.

Wild horse and or burro: Burro only.

Size: The landscape of this 244,000-acre HMA is diverse.

Population: The current population is estimated to be about 209.  Although BLM states in their management section that the population is about 140 burros and share the lands with livestock.

Appropriate Management Level: Not listed.  There is just a general statement about removing them if vegetation is a problem.

Last gather:  Not listed

Future gathers:  Not listed

Genetic testing:  Not known

Genetic traits.  Wild burros living in the Big Sandy HMA today are typically grey in color, though some may be brown, pink or black. These animals weigh between 450 and 500 pounds and average 44 inches in height at the shoulder when fully grown.

Black Mountain HMA

The Black Mountain Herd Management Area (HMA) situates itself in extreme northwestern Arizona. Located just 15 miles west of Kingman, the area parallels the eastern shoreline of the Colorado River for 80 miles, from Hoover Dam south to the Needles Bridge in California.  The town of Oatman is part of the Black Mountain HMA.

Wild horse and or burro: Burro only.  

Size: 1.1 million acres covered with Mojave Desert shrub and Grand Canyon Desert shrub vegetation.

Population: 730 animals, with about two-thirds of the population living in the southern half of the HMA.

Appropriate Management Level:  478 wild burros, coexisting with livestock, desert bighorn sheep and desert mule deer.

Last gather:  About 90 wild burros are removed each year

Future gathers:  Yearly but not listed.

Genetic testing:  Not known

Genetic traits.

 Cerbat (HA)Just five miles north of Kingman, Arizona lies the Cerbat herd Area (HA) in the northwestern portion of the state. East of U.S. Highway 93 toward Las Vegas, Nevada, the Cerbat HA runs west of Stockton Hill Road. The historic mining town of Chloride, Arizona sits at the western base of the HA.Wild horse and or burro: Wild horse.Size: 83,000 acres of Arizona interior chaparral grassland and Grand Canyon desert shrub.Population: 60 wild horsesAppropriate Management Level:  None established.Last gather:  Herd is stable.Future gathers:  No gathers required.Genetic testing:  Not knownGenetic traits.  The body size of a Cerbat horse is usually small, with an average weight ranging between 750 to 800 pounds and an average height of 14 to 16 hands. The horses are predominately bays, with numerous red, strawberry and blue roans. Other colors include grey, black, sorrel and dun.Confusion http://www.blm.gov/az/st/en/prog/whb.html states that there are 200 wild horses in the Cerbat Mountains but could not be determined if this is the Cerbat (HA) or some place different.  They show this location as northwest of Kingman and nestled between the Cibola Wildlife Refuge and the Army’s Yuma Proving Ground.

Cibola-Trigo HMA

Reaching across the border of Arizona and California, the Cibola-Trigo Herd Management Area (HMA) extends from Imperial Dam, west of the Colorado River, to Walters Camp in California. Located primarily between U.S. Highway 95 and the Colorado River, and Interstates 8 and 10, the HMA is about 20 miles north of Yuma, Arizona.

Wild horse and or burro: Wild horse and burros.

Size: HMA comprised of nearly one million acres in the lower Sonoran Desert.

Population: 527 burros and 319 wild horses.

Appropriate Management Level:  165 burros and 150 for wild horses http://www.blm.gov/az/st/en/prog/whb/gather.html

Last gather:  The BLM completed the Cibola-Trigo Wild Burro gather Thursday, June 14, 2012, gathering 350 wild burros.  On the another BLM page it did not list the June 14, 2012 gather and stated that the herds were stable.

The last major wild burro removal within the Cibola-Trigo HMA was in 2002, when 282 wild burros were gathered. Between August 1997 and May 2002, a total of 1,390 wild burros were removed and placed for adoption. Budget constraints would not allow additional removals except for a small gather of 100 burros in September 2010.

Future gathers:  No gathers listed.  When the population exceeds the Appropriate Management Level, determined through vegetative monitoring studies, the BLM removes some of the animals and offers them to the public through its Adopt a Wild Horse of Burro Program.

Genetic testing:  Not known

Genetic traits.  Wild horse herds have several Appaloosa studs.

The burros found here are typically grey in color and are fairly fine boned. The burros average about 350 to 400 pounds and 40 inches in height.

Harquahala HA

The Harquahala (hark-ah-hay-la) Herd Area (HA) lies just six miles south of Aguila, Arizona on Eagle Eye Road, some 25 miles west of Wickenburg, Arizona on U.S. Highway 60. Wild burros inhabit the Harquahala Mountains, as well as the surrounding foothills and valleys.

Wild horse and or burro: Burros only.

Size: 126,000-acre area extends from the Harquahala mountains on the north to the Big Horn Mountains on the south.

Population: Estimated to be about 69 burros.  Appropriate Management Level:  Zero.  BLM classified the Harquahala Mountains as a “zero burro population” area. This required removing all burros from the mountain range. This decision was based on conflicts in the region with private landowners, agricultural interests, bighorn sheep and other resources. Funding, however, was not provided and total removal has never occurred.

Last gather:  Not stated.

Future gathers:  No gathers listed.  When the population exceeds the Appropriate Management Level, determined through vegetative monitoring studies, the BLM removes some of the animals and offers them to the public through its Adopt a Wild Horse of Burro Program.

Genetic testing:  Not known

Genetic traits.  None

Havasu HMA

The Havasu Herd Management Area (HMA) lies in west central Arizona along the Colorado and Bill Williams rivers. The HMA is divided into two by the Colorado River. The HMA also sits adjacent to the Chemeheuvi Herd Management Area across the California border.

Wild horse and or burro: Burro only.    

Size: 450,800 acres of Lower Colorado Sonoran Desert. In Arizona, the HMA measures 372,570 acres, while the California portion encompasses 78,220 acres.

Population: 142 burros, with about half living within the Arizona portion of the HMA.

Another page has a different population. 540 animals (240 in Arizona and 300 in California). https://www.blm.gov/adoptahorse/herdareas.php?showAll=yes&herd_areas_seq=104&herd_states_seq=1

Appropriate Management Level:  320 wild burros
(170 in Arizona and 150 in California),

Last gather:  A wild burro round up organized in October 2011 by BLM resulted in capture and removal of 57 wild burros from a herd north of Havasu. The burros were placed into the agency’s burro adoption program.  A wild burro round up organized in October 2011 by BLM resulted in capture and removal of 57 wild burros from a herd north of Havasu. The burros were placed into the agency’s burro adoption program.

http://www.havasunews.com/news/adot-to-fence-sr-to-contain-wild-burros/article_18d7a383-dfbf-5f4d-834f-ceb1e4b9c98b.html

At the time of the round up, BLM officials confirmed an overall population of 800 to 900 wild burros in Mohave County. A herd of 200 roam south and east of Havasu. This might cover more then the Havasu HMA.

Future gathers:  Not listed

Genetic testing:  Not known

Genetic traits.  About 90 percent of the burros are gray in color, with the remaining 10 percent being black, brown, white pinto or piebald. Some burros possess the shoulder cross characteristic of the ancestral Nubian wild ass, and many have leg barrings associated with the Somali wild ass.

Lake Pleasant HMA

The Lake Pleasant Herd Management Area (HMA) is located just 25 miles northwest of Phoenix, Arizona, west of Interstate Highway 17 and north of State Highway 74. Taking its name from the well-known body of water found here, the HMA lies northeast of Lake Pleasant.

Wild horse and or burro: Burros only.    

Size: This HMA is 103,000 acres in the Sonoran Desert.

Population: 357 burros.

Appropriate Management Level: 208 burros.

Last gather:  Although 149 above the AML the BLM page states that the population of burros remains fairly constant

Future gathers:  Not listed – as needed general statement but a unique management action is required at times caused by the lake’s fluctuating water levels.  Burros can be stranded on ‘islands’ and need to be rescued.

Genetic testing:  Not known

Genetic traits.  The burros in this area weigh about 425 pounds and stand about 40 inches high.

Additional info: March 2012, 6 burros were shot, no one found the killers.  February 2009 11 burros were shot and killed.

Little Harquahala HA

The Little Harquahala Herd Area (HA) is located southeast of Salome, Arizona, between U.S. Highway 60 and Interstate 10. Taking the Salome to Buckeye Road southeast toward Interstate 10 accesses the area. The extreme portion of the Harquahala Mountains and the majority of the Little Harquahala Mountains lie within the area.

Wild horse and or burro: No burro or wild horse.      

Size: Herd Area includes 66,000 acres of upper Sonoran Desert habitat, where the desert mountains are separated by the Centennial Wash.

Population: Zero burros.  Today, the wild burro population inhabiting the Little Harquahala Herd Area is nonexistent.  1980’s because of livestock area was zeroed out.

Appropriate Management Level: Zero.  The BLM Lower Gila Resource Management Plan and Management Framework Plan Amendment, currently pending approval, proposes establishing the Little Harquahala HA as a management area.

Last gather:  Not listed

Future gathers:  Not listed.

Genetic testing:  Not known

Genetic traits:

Painted Rock HA

Just 11 miles west of Gila Bend, Arizona lies the Painted Rock Herd Area (HA). The region sits just off Interstate 10, 15 miles north of Painted Rock Road. The area surrounds the Painted Rocks Reservoir.

Wild horse and or burro: Burro only.

Size: Herd Area is nearly 38,000 acres of lower Sonoran Desert. Population: About 25 burros.

Appropriate Management Level: Zero  https://www.blm.gov/epl-front-office/projects/lup/11856/37545/39346/26-App_M-Painted_Rock_Herd_Manageability.pdf

Last gather:  Not listed

Future gathers:  Not listed.

Genetic testing:  Not known

Genetic traits:  Burros in this area are typically grey in color and fairly fine-boned. They average about 425 pounds and stand about 40 inches high.

Tassi-Gold Butte HMA

The Tassi-Gold Butte Management Area (HMA) lies in southeast Nevada and northwest Arizona, between the Overton Arm of Lake Mad and the western boundary of Grand Canyon National Park. The region sits 70 miles southwest of St. George, Utah and 50 miles south of Mesquite, Nevada.

Wild horse and or burro: Burro only.

Size: Roughly 30 square miles, or about 101,000 acres.

Population: 10 burros live within the HMA.

Appropriate Management Level: Not listed

Last gather:  Not listed, but he wild burros living within the Tassi portion of the Tassi-Gold Butte Herd Management Area have been completely removed, as a result of a biological evaluation, a biological opinion and the findings in the BLM’s Desert Tortoise Recovery Plan.

Future gathers:  Not listed.

Genetic testing:  Not known

Genetic traits:  Nearly 80 percent of the burros in this area are gray in color, with the remaining 20 percent being black, brown, white, pinto or piebald. Some burros possess the shoulder cross characteristic of the ancestral Nubain wild ass, and many have leg barrings associated with the Somali wild ass. Adult burros here average 48 inches in height and weight about 350 pounds.

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If you have information or photographs you would like to add to the page contact us, indicate that you are the origin of information, have your permission to publish and if you want us to with-hold your name. Please put the state and the word “addition” in the subject line to help us get to your email faster. send to WildHorseEducation@gmail.com

 

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